Injuries we Treat

Spinal injuries
Cervical strain
Head Aches
Herniated Disc
Spinal Stenosis
Neck or Back Pain
Repetitive Strain Inury
Sciatica
Spondylolysis/Spondylolisthesis
Scoliosis
Hip/Leg
Hamstring Strain
Hip osteoarthritis
Total hip replacement
Piriformis Syndrome
Groin Strain
Knee
Ligament sprain
Ligament repair
IT band syndrome
Osteoarthritis
Total Knee Replacement
Patellar Tendonitis
Foot/Ankle
Ankle sprains and fractures
Calf Strain
Plantar Fascitis
Shin Splints
Achille’s Tendonitis
Foot Sprains
Morton’s Neuroma
Shoulder
Impingement
Rotator Cuff Tendonitis
Rotator Cuff Tear
Frozen Shoulder
Osteoarthritis
Post Fracture
Bicep’s Tendonitis
Bicep’s Tear
Elbow
Tennis
Golfer’s
Cubital Tunnel
Fracture
Repetitive Injury
Hand
Repetitive Injury
Carpal Tunnel
Fracture/Dislocation
Osteoarthritis
Wrist Sprains

Lower back
Back pain often develops without a specific cause that your doctor can identify with a
test or imaging study. Conditions commonly linked to back pain include:

Muscle or ligament strain
Repeated heavy lifting or a sudden awkward movement may strain back muscles and spinal ligaments. If you’re in poor physical condition, constant strain on your back may cause painful muscle spasm.

Bulging or ruptured disks
Disks act as cushions between the individual bones (vertebrae) in your spine. Sometimes, the soft material inside a disk may bulge out of place or rupture and press on a nerve. The presence of a bulging or ruptured disk on an X-ray doesn’t automatically equal back pain, though. Disk disease is often found incidentally; many people who don’t have back pain turn out to have bulging or ruptured disks when they undergo spine X-rays for some other reason

Arthritis
Osteoarthritis can affect the lower back. In some cases, arthritis in the spine can lead to a narrowing of the space around the spinal cord, a condition called spinal stenosis.
Skeletal irregularities. Back pain can occur if your spine curves in an abnormal way. Scoliosis, a condition in which your spine curves to the side, also may lead to back pain, but generally only if the scoliosis is quite severe.

Osteoporosis
Compression fractures of your spine’s vertebrae can occur if your bones become porous and brittle.

At Achilles clinic we treat a wide variety of lower back injuries. We take a detailed
patient history, performing orthopedic and neurological testing (where appropriate ) for musculoskeletal pain and nerve dysfunction. We tailor treatment to suit your individual problem. We perform soft tissue therapy, spinal mobilisation and manipulation ( where it is safe to do so). Other treatment includes intramuscular dry needling, electrotherapy. You get one to one attention by Brendan for the duration of your injury.

Neck pain
Patients suffering from neck pain are one of our most common clinical presentations. Patients suffering from headache, although less common, are also often seen. Pain is usually caused by local structures within or around the head or neck, or, may occasionally be referred from other sources (such as the upper back, jaw or shoulders).

Sudden onset neck pain often occurs in individuals involved with contact sports, motor vehicle accidents, heavy lifting, bending forward or sideways, twisting of the neck, or, combinations of these movements. It is also relatively common for patients to experience sudden onset neck pain during a trivial bending movement, such as during sneezing.

These acute injuries usually involve tearing of connective tissue around the joints of the neck and often have associated muscle spasm. One of the most common causes of sudden onset neck pain (with or without pain radiating into the upper back, shoulder, upper arm, elbow, forearm, wrist or hand or headache), is a Cervical Disc Bulge Facet Joint Sprains are another common cause of sudden onset neck pain.

Gradual onset neck pain often occurs in those patients involved in computer work, repetitive or prolonged bending, slouching (especially when sitting or during sleep), shoulders forwards, lifting, twisting movements or combinations of these activities. One of the most common causes of gradual onset neck pain (with or without pain radiating into the upper back, shoulder, upper arm, elbow, forearm, wrist or hand or headache), is a Cervical Disc Bulge

In older patients with gradual onset neck pain, one of the most likely causes of symptoms is degenerative changes in the spine (i.e. Neck Arthritis).

There are numerous other causes of head and neck pain, some of which present suddenly due to a specific incident, others which develop gradually over time.

Cervical disc bulge
Tearing of connective tissue surrounding a disc in the neck with subsequent bulging of disc material. One of the most common causes of neck pain, typically as a result of bending forwards of the neck, slouching (especially during sleep or when sitting), shoulders forward, lifting or twisting forces, or trivial movements such as sneezing. May cause neck pain with or without symptoms radiating into the upper back, shoulder, upper arm, elbow, forearm, wrist or hand or headache and often associated muscle spasm. Pain may increase on firmly touching the affected level of the spine and spinal movement is often restricted.

Occasionally there may be no neck pain, with only symptoms down the affected arm or only headache. Pins and needles or numbness is occasionally present in the affected arm or hand. Symptoms often increase with repetitive or prolonged slouching (especially during sitting or sleep), bending forwards, shoulders forwards, lifting, neck rotation or side bending movements or sneezing, and, are often worse first thing in the morning.

Facet joint sprains
Tearing of connective tissue surrounding one of the joints located on either side of the spine typically as a result of excessive stretching of tissue usually during end of range spine typically as a result of excessive stretching of tissue usually during end of range bending, slouching, twisting, arching or lifting movements or combinations of these forces. Typically causes local neck pain on one side of the spine that may increase on firmly touching the affected joint. Protective muscle spasm is often present.

Cervicogenic headache
Headache originating from the neck typically as a result of damage to the joints located at the upper aspect of the neck, often as a result of a sudden neck movement (e.g. whiplash), a collision during contact sports or heavy lifting. Typically causes a constant, dull ache that may present in the back of the head, top of the forehead, behind the eye, in the temple region or less commonly, around the jaw or ear. Usually associated with neck pain, stiffness and difficulty turning the neck.

Symptoms may also increase on firmly touching the affected level of the spine, usually on one side of the neck, just below the base of the skull. Occasionally other symptoms may be present such as pins and needles, numbness, dizziness, nausea or light headedness.

Wry Neck (Facet or discogenic)
Pain and stiffness in the neck or upper back originating from damage and subsequent ‘locking’ of one of the facet joints of the neck or damage to one of the discs in the neck, resulting in a noticeable limitation of movement and postural deformity (often with the head turned to one side). Usually occurs either waking in the morning or due to a specific activity often involving a sudden, quick movement of the neck or heavy lifting. Muscle spasm, restricted movement and tenderness on firmly touching the affected level of the spine are usually present. Pain may be felt in the neck with or without symptoms radiating into the upper back.

In the case of discogenic wry neck Pain may be felt in the neck with or without symptoms radiating into the upper back, shoulder, upper arm, elbow, forearm, wrist or hand or headache. Occasionally pins and needles or numbness may be present in the affected arm or hand.

Whiplash
An acceleration / deceleration injury of the neck typically occurring as a result of a motor vehicle accident whereby the neck is forcefully thrown forwards, then backwards. Muscle spasm, restricted movement and tenderness on firmly touching the affected levels of the spine are usually present. Pain may be felt in the neck with or without symptoms radiating into the upper back, shoulder, upper arm, elbow, forearm, wrist or hand or headache. Occasionally pins and needles, numbness or weakness may be present in the affected arm or hand.

Vertebral fracture
A fracture of the vertebrae typically as a result of trauma such as a motor vehicle accident or heavy collision in contact sports such as rugby. Typically causes significant pain, loss of spinal range of movement and tenderness on firmly touching the affected vertebrae. Occasionally pins and needles, numbness or weakness in the neck, upper back or upper limb may be experienced.

At Achilles clinic we treat a wide variety of neck injuries. We take a detailed patient history, performing orthopedic and neurological testing (where appropriate ) for musculoskeletal pain and nerve dysfunction. We tailor treatment to suit your individual musculoskeletal pain and nerve dysfunction. We tailor treatment to suit your individual problem. We perform soft tissue therapy, spinal mobilisation and manipulation ( where it is safe to do so).